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51:31

Lemony Snicket Dons A Trenchcoat

In Who Could That Be at This Hour?, a prequel to A Series of Unfortunate Events, Daniel Handler satirizes pulp mysteries and uncovers the parallels between detective fiction and childhood. In both, he says, an outsider is trying to make his way in a mysteriously corrupt world.

Interview
51:36

'Fresh Air' Remembers Author Maurice Sendak

Author and illustrator Maurice Sendak, whose book Where the Wild Things Are became a favorite for generations of kids, died at age 83. Fresh Air remembers Sendak with excerpts from several interviews.

Children's book author Maurice Sendak poses with one of the creatures he created for his timeless book 'Where the Wild Things Are'
20:36

This Pig Wants To Party: Maurice Sendak's Latest

Bumble-ardy is a deeply imaginative tale about an orphaned pig who longs for a birthday party. Sendak, who is 83, wrote and illustrated the book while caring for his longtime partner, who died of cancer in 2007. "I did Bumble-ardy to save myself," Sendak says. "I did not want to die with him."

Interview
04:22

'Toon' Anthology Offers A Treasury Of Classic Comics

Before there was Superman, other comics roamed the funny pages. The TOON Treasury of Classic Children's Comics is an anthology of these forgotten gems, lovingly selected by famed comic artist Art Spiegelman and his wife, Francoise Mouly.

Review
05:52

Wimpy Kid': A Hilarious Take On Middle School Life

If a comic book about surviving middle school doesn't sound like a must read to you, think again. Critic Maureen Corrigan says that Jeff Kinney's Dog Days — the latest in his Diary of a Wimpy Kid series — hits home with any crowd.

Review
31:19

Madonna: Pop Icon, Children's Writer

After a chart-topping and occasionally controversial music career, she is now turning out children's books, publishing four in just over a year. Her latest is The Adventures of Abdi. The others are The English Roses, Mr. Peabody's Apples and Yakov and the Seven Thieves. Her fifth, Lotsa de Casha, is due out in April 2005.

Interview
37:26

Author Daniel Pinkwater, 'Looking for Bobowicz'

His new book is Looking for Bobowicz. In addition to his duties as an NPR commentator, he's written more than 60 books for children and the young at heart, including Irving and Muktuk: Bad Bears in the Big City and The Picture of Morty and Ray. Pinkwater lives in upstate New York with his wife Jill, who illustrated Looking for Bobowicz.

34:37

Artist, Writer and Designer Maurice Sendak

His new book Brundibar is based on a Czech opera of the same name. It was set to music by Hans Krasa, who was imprisoned in the Nazi concentration camp Terezin and later killed in Auschwitz. The opera was performed 55 times by the children of Terezin. Sendak has also written and illustrated the classic children's books Where the Wild Things Are, In The Night Kitchen and Outside Over There. Time magazine has said, "For Sendak, visiting the land of the very young is not something that requires a visa.

Interview
18:50

Illustrator and Writer James Warhola

His new book is Uncle Andy's: A faabbbulous visit with Andy Warhol. It's a children's story about going to visit Warhol, in which Warhola chronicles one of the many trips he took with his family from Pittsburgh to New York City.

Interview
19:31

Children's book author Eoin Colfer

He's the creator of the Artemis Fowl series, featuring a 12-year-old millionaire criminal mastermind. Two of the three books in the series have been on The New York Times best seller list. The books are a combination of science fiction, fantasy, fairy tale and thriller. They are Artemis Fowl, Artemis Fowl: The Arctic Incident and Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code.

Interview
08:08

We Remember Cecile de Brunhoff

We remember Cecile de Brunhoff, who died April 7 at the age of 99. It was the bedtime story she made up and told her sons in 1930 that became the basis for the world-famous Babar the Elephant stories. Her husband, Laurent de Brunhoff, wrote down the story and provided the illustrations. Terry talked with their son, author and illustrator Laurent de Brunhoff, who followed in his father's footsteps, and has written and drawn the continuing adventures of Babar the Elephant for the past 40 years. This interview first aired Feb. 28, 1990.

14:01

Writer Michael Patrick Hearn Discusses "The Wizard of Oz."

Writer Michael Patrick Hearn. He’s edited “The Annotated Wizard of Oz: A Centennial Edition” (W.W. Norton). The book commemorates the 100th anniversary of the publication of L. Frank Baum’s classic “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.” Back in 1900, the first 10,000 copies printed of Baum’s book sold out in two weeks. Baum wrote 14 Oz books in all.

05:54

Remembering Edward Gorey.

Macabre cartoonist and illustrator Edward Gorey died on Saturday at the age of 75 of a heart attack. His illustrations are the opening credits of the PBS show "Mystery." He wrote over 100 books including “The Gashlycrumb Tinies” an alphabet book which began “A is for Amy who fell down the stairs.” One of his other books “The Doubtful Guest” was a classic, about a creature who shows up uninvited at a dreary mansion and becomes a member of the family. Toward the end of his life, GOREY lived in a 200 year old house in Cape Cod, with his five or six cats. (REBROADCAST from 4/2/92)

Illustrator Edward Gorey
38:47

Children’s Book Writer Christopher Curtis.

Children’s book writer Christopher Curtis has become the first writer to receive the prestigious Newberry Medal and the Coretta Scott King Author award for his book, “Bud, Not Buddy.” (Delacorte press). The story, set in the Depression Era, is about an orphan boy and his search for a home. Curtis is also the first African-American to win the Newbery Medal in 22 years. And he’s also author of “The Watsons Go to Birmingham” which was singled out for many awards. Before becoming a writer, CURTIS worked on an automobile assembly line in Flint, Michigan.

21:19

Remembering Sesame Street Songwriter Jeff Moss

We remember Jeff Moss, one of the original creators and writers of "Sesame Street." He died Thursday, at the age of 56, from colon cancer. Moss created Cookie Monster and Oscar the Grouch, and wrote such songs as "Rubber Ducky" and "People in Your Neighborhood." He won 14 Emmy's, four Grammy's, and an Acacdemy Award nomination for his work on "Sesame Street" and with the Muppets. Moss was also the author of books for children, including "Hieronymus White: A Bird Who Believed That He Always Was Right" (REBROADCAST from 11/30/94)

Obituary

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