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Surviving a Lynching.

Author and museum director James Cameron. Sixty four years ago, an organized mob of more than 10,000 white men and women dragged Cameron and two other black teenage men from a jail cell in Marion, Indiana. The mob mercilessly beat the three young men. They lynched two. Cameron was spared. In 1984, he recounted this experience in his memoir "A Time of Terror" (Available now from Black Classic Press). Then in 1988, Cameron founded the Black Holocaust Museum in Milwaukee. The Museum houses photographs, books, articles and artifacts documenting the atrocities endured by blacks in this country. Cameron modeled the Museum after the Jewish Holocaust museum in Israel. (Interview by Marty Moss-Coane)

46:53

Other segments from the episode on March 8, 1994

Fresh Air with Terry Gross, March 8, 1994: Interview with James Cameron; Review of Martin Amis's book "Visiting Mrs. Nabokov and Other Excursions."

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