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10:01

Bill Viola's "Video Art."

Video artist Bill Viola. His work draws on his extensive travel throughout Northern India, the Sahara, the American West and Europe and strives to establish video as an art independent of film and television. Viola has been working with video since 1970, including stints as an artist-in-residence at WNET's Artists' Television Laboratory, and as a Guggenheim Fellow.

Interview
10:00

Computer Animator Steven Segal.

Computer animator Steven Segal. Segal does his programming on his home computer, unlike most computer animation which is composed on complex processors. His entry in a national computer animation festival is titled "Dance of the Stumblers."

27:54

Test Pilot General Chuck Yeager.

Yeager broke the sound barrier flying the X-1 jet plane. The accomplishment not only helped revolutionize aviation; it put him in the public eye. He later appeared on the cover of Time Magazine and television commercials. His newly-published second memoir is called Press On!.

Interview
22:22

Special Effects Impresario Chris Walas Tackles Directing.

Special effects master and director Chris Walas. He directed "Fly II," the sequel to the popular remake of "The Fly," about a scientist whose genetic experiments run amok. Walas was responsible for the special effects in "The Fly." He got his start in film making working for the special effects team for several Roger Corman films, including "Piranha." His work was first noticed in the film "Scanners;" it was Walas who created and choreographed the famous exploding head scene.

Interview
22:14

James Cameron Discusses Underwater Directing.

Director James Cameron. Though his career is relatively young, Cameron has established himself as one of the best directors and writers of intense dramas that jump between exhilaration and terror. His best-known work is "Aliens," the sequel to the 1979 sci-fi classic in which Lt. Ripley, played by Sigourney Weaver, stalks a vicious alien that's invaded her spacecraft and is slaughtering the crew. The film was nominated for seven Oscars and won two.

Interview
22:35

Computer Scientist Bill Joy.

Bill Joy. He's a founder and Vice President of Research and Development for Sun Microsystems, one of the most innovative and successful computer companies. He imagines the computer of 14 years from now, a machine he calls the "2001 computer." It will be a phenomenally fast machine (128,000 times the speed of current computers), with a memory capacity the equivalent of 300,000 books, all fitting into the size of a sugar cube. (Interview with Sedge Thomson)

Interview

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