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51:44

Black Women: Love and Identity.

Marita Golden became part of a group of black radicals as student at American University in Washington, D.C. After graduating from the Columbia School of Journalism, Golden married a Nigerian and moved to Nigeria with him. Golden was shocked by the role of women and wives in the country, which she found stifling. Taking her son with her, Golden left her husband and returned to the United States. She discuss her life and experiences in her memoir "Migrations of the Heart."

27:05

The Ideology and Duty of the Post-Colonial Writer.

Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe. Achebe is one of Africa's foremost writers. His earlier works include Things Fall Apart, A Man of the People and Arrow of God. His latest work, his first novel in 25 years, is titled Anthills of the Savannah.

45:21

Wole Soyinka Discusses Current Affairs in Nigeria.

Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka. He was the first African to be awarded the Nobel prize for literature (in 1986), and he's been called Africa's "finest writers." He is a dramatist, poet, novelist, critic, and political writer. Some of his works have been banned by Nigerian regimes. He's gone into exile several times and has been imprisoned for political protests. He's written 21 books, including "Myth, Literature, and the African World," and his autobiography, "Ake': The Years of Childhood." (Ventura books).

22:19

Wole Soyinka Updates Us on the Situation in Nigeria.

Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka. He was the first African to be awarded the Nobel prize for literature (in 1986), and he's been called one of Africa's "finest writers." He is a dramatist, poet, novelist, critic, and political writer. Some of his works have been banned by Nigerian regimes. He's gone into exile several times and has been imprisoned for political protests. He's written 21 books, including "Myth, Literature, and the African World," and his autobiography, "Ake': The Years of Childhood." (Ventura books).

22:29

Richard Dicker Discusses the Recent Events in Nigeria.

Associate Counsel for Human Rights Watch, Richard Dicker. He'll discuss the situation in Nigeria. Last week poet, playwright and minority rights activist Ken Saro-Wiwa was sentenced to death and killed, along with eight other men. Saro-Wiwa lead the "Movement for the Survival of Ogoni People," a movement to help the impoverished Ogoni. They had been fighting for rights to petroleum reserves and compensation for environmental damage by Shell Oil Company, a lead oil operator in the country. The deaths have been condemned by many world leaders.

09:54

Brian Anderson Discusses Shell's Responsibility for Unrest in Nigeria.

Managing Director of Shell Petroleum Development Co., Brian Anderson. In 1993, Shell pulled out of Ogoniland, the oil rich part of Nigeria, after it's pipelines were sabotaged. But they still operate in other parts of Nigeria. Human Rights Watch is calling on them, and other oil companies to close down their operations in Nigeria. (Interview by Marty Moss-Coane)

18:02

Hakeem Olajuwon Discusses "Living the Dream."

Center for the Houston Rockets, Hakeem Olajuwon He was born in Nigeria, and came to the United States on a basketball scholarship to attend the University of Houston. He helped the team reach the NCAA Final Four. He's written his memoir, "Living the Dream: My Life and Basketball," (Little, Brown).

31:56

Dapo Olorunyomi Discusses the Nigerian Elections.

Nigerian journalist Dapo Olorunyomi... He is the editor of five of the country's leading opposition publications. His work uncovering corruption in the Nigerian Government helped him win the World Press Review 1995 Editor-of-the-Year Award. Olorunyomi is now in exile in the United States. It's the third anniversary of the democratic elections annulled by the military.

21:25

Nigerian Playwright Wole Soyinka on His Recent Exile

The Nobel Prize winner and activist talks with Terry about his newest book "The Open Sore of a Continent: A Personal Narrative of the Nigerian Crisis." It's been nearly a year since the Nigerian military government executed dissident writer Ken Saro-Wiwa. The killing sparked international protests that today has left Nigeria politically isolated. The events that led up to the execution in November 1995 mark Nigeria's decline from a thriving post-colonial state to its present military dictatorship.

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