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Drug addiction--Psychological aspects

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06:41

'Bigger Than Life': A Subversive Suburban Surprise

Directed by Nicholas Ray, the 1956 film Bigger Than Life, stars James Mason as a schoolteacher who experiences wild mod swings and psychotic episodes after becoming addicted to his arthritis medication. Critic John Powers applauds the film, which he says "has a juiciness missing from a period show like Mad Men."

20:47

TV Writer Jerry Stahl on Kicking the Habit

Writer Jerry Stahl talks about his 1995 memoir "Permanent Midnight" (Warner Bros). Stahl was a successful journalist, a scriptwriter for cult film classics like "Cafe Flesh," and "Dr. Caligari," who went on to write for the hit TV shows "Moonlighting," "ALF" and "thirtysomething." Stahl was also a junkie. In his memoir he writes, "You might say that success ruined me. You might say I ruined success." "Permanent Midnight" is now a film starring Ben Stiller. It opens today. This originally aired 5/17/95.

21:01

TV Writer Jerry Stahl on Kicking the Habit

Writer Jerry Stahl. His 1995 memoir is Permanent Midnight (Warner Bros) has just been published in paperback. Stahl was a successful journalist, a scriptwriter for cult film classics like "Cafe Flesh," and "Dr. Caligari," who went on to write for the hit TV shows "Moonlighting," "ALF" and "thirtysomething." Stahl was also a junkie. He writes in his memoir, "You might say that success ruined me. You might say I ruined success." Stahl is now a freelance writer for British Esquire, Details, L.A.Weekly, Buzz.

22:14

TV Writer Jerry Stahl on Kicking the Habit

Stahl has a new memoir called Permanent Midnight. He was a successful journalist, a scriptwriter for cult film classics like "Cafe Flesh," and "Dr. Caligari," who went on to write for the hit TV shows "Moonlighting," "ALF" and "thirtysomething." Stahl was also a junkie. He writes,"You might say that success ruined me. You might say I ruined success."

15:58

Pharmacologist Dr. Avram Goldstein Discusses Addiction.

Pharmacologist Dr. Avram Goldstein. He set up some of the first methadone clinics to treat heroin addiction in California, and has a new book "Addiction: From Biology to Drug Policy" (Freeman). Goldstein argues that addictions are diseases, and must be considered a public health problem. A study released last month may back him up: 500,000 American deaths a year are attributed to cigarette, alcohol and drug use.

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