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11:47

From the Archives: Crime Novelist Elmore Leonard.

Novelist Elmore Leoanrd. The new film "Jackie Brown" is based on his crime novel, "Rum Punch." It's directed by Quentin Tarantino. He's 72 years old and has been called "the greatest living writer of crime fiction" (New York Times). Though he'd been writing for decades, critics didn't take notice of him until the 1980s. Now his work is known for it tight prose, "ear-perfect" dialogue and depiction of lower class life.

27:27

Crime Novelist Elmore Leonard.

Novelist Elmore Leonard. He's 70 years old and has been called "the greatest living writer of crime fiction" (New York Times). Though he'd been writing for decades, critics didn't take notice of him until the 1980s. Now his work is known for it tight prose, "ear-perfect" dialogue and depiction of lower class life. Leonard's written thirty-two novels, including the bestsellers Pronto, Maximum Bob, and Get Shorty which has been made into a film, starring John Travolta and Gene Hackman.

26:29

From the Archives: Crime Novelist Elmore Leonard.

Novelist Elmore Leonard. He's 70 years old and has been called "the greatest living writer of crime fiction" (New York Times). Though he'd been writing for decades, critics didn't take notice of him until the 1980s. Now his work is known for it tight prose, "ear-perfect" dialogue and depiction of lower class life. LeonardD's written thirty-two novels, including the bestsellers "Pronto," "Maximum Bob," and "Get Shorty" which was made into a film, starring John Travolta and Gene Hackman. It's now out on video.

42:52

How Fiction Reflects the Reality of Crime

A broadcast of a panel held at New York University in April called "Cops and Writers: Crime and Punishment in Literature and Real Life." The panel, sponsored by the PEN American Center and The New York Review of Books, features police officials and writers, including crime writer Walter Mosley and author Joyce Carol Oates. The panel focuses on the fine line between crime fiction and crime reality. The writers talk about the fact that crime novelists generally draw on real criminals and real crimes to create their characters and plot.

22:17

Convict Turned Novelist, Edward Jones.

Writer Edward "Hacksaw" Jones -- so named for his many prison escapes. He was the only criminal put on the FBI's most-wanted list without a history of physical violence. When he was still in prison he began writing. He's written two novels, "Cage," and "Awake," as well as an autobiography, "Hacksaw." He's got a new novel, "Stoneface." (published by Donald I. Fine, Inc., New York).

11:05

Mystery Novelist Ruth Rendell.

British crime writer Ruth Rendell. She's written over 30 mysteries which fall into several categories--detective novels with main character Chief Inspector Reg Wexford, psychological thrillers exploring the darker side of the human mind, and a new series of "more feminine, less bossy" mysteries under the pseudonym of Barbara Vine. Her latest novel, "The Bridesmaid," continues in the tradition of the psychological thriller. It's about a young woman who informs her lover that he must prove his love to her by committing murder.

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