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18:00

Tom Parker Bowles, Dining Out on Adventure

Snacking on water beetles in Laos, dining on dog in Korea: Tom Parker Bowles, food writer for Britain's The Mail on Sunday, Night and Day, and Tatler (and son of Prince Charles' wife, Camilla Parker Bowles), has written what he's described as "a travel book about weird food."

It's called The Year of Eating Dangerously: A Global Adventure in Search of Culinary Extremes.

15:11

Eat Up — And Don't Forget the Palate Cleansers

Food scientist Massimo Marcone travels the world's remotest corners to investigate bizarre food "delicacies" — cheese infested with squirming maggots, coffee brewed from coffee beans extracted from the feces of a cat-like creature, salad oil made from nuts excreted by goats, and so on.

Marcone teaches food science at the University of Guelph, in Ontario. His new book is In Bad Taste? The Adventures and Science Behind Food Delicacies

20:09

'Gourmet' Magazine Editor Ruth Reichl

Food critic and editor-in-chief of 'Gourmet' magazine Ruth Reichl has completed her third memoir, 'Garlic and Sapphires: The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise.' Last year Reichl edited 'The Gourmet Cookbook' that culled from 60 years of 'Gourmet's' back issues. This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 5, 2004.

21:42

Food Scientist Harold McGee

We have the second part of an interview with renowned food writer Harold McGee (the first part was broadcast on Dec. 23). McGee's book, On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, has been revised and updated. The book is an exposition of food and cooking techniques, technology and history.

12:00

Columnist Robert Wolke

Columnist Robert Wolke writes Food 101 for The Washington Post, a syndicated column that won the James Beard Foundation Award for best newspaper column. He's the author of the new book What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained. Wolke is also professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh.

15:32

From the Archives: Food Critic Ruth Reichl.

Food critic Ruth Reichl ("RYE-shall"). On April 30, 1999 she will leave The New York Times and become Editor and Chief of Gourmet magazine. Her book "Tender at the Bone: Growing up at the Table," has just been published in paperback. (Broadway Books) Reichl has been the restaurant critic for The New York Times since 1993. Prior to that, she reviewed restaurants for the Los Angeles Times. She ran her own restaurant in Berkeley, California in the 1970s. Originally aired 6/29/98.

31:09

Food Critic Ruth Reichl.

Food critic Ruth Reichl. Her new book is called "Tender at the Bone: Growing up at the Table," (Random House) and it's her memoir of a lifelong passion for food. Reichl has been the restaurant critic for the New York Times since 1993. Prior to that, she reviewed restaurants for the Los Angeles Times. She ran her own restaurant in Berkeley, California in the 1970s.

21:26

How to Cook for HIV-Positive People

Chef Robert Lehmann is the former Executive Chef of MANNA, a meals-delivery service organization for homebound people with AIDS in Philadelphia. He developed diet and nutrition standards for people who are HIV positive. He has a new book: "Cooking for Life: A Guide to Nutrition and Food Safety for the HIV-positive Community" Lehmann is currently Projects Coordinator for HIV Nutrition Research at The Graduate Hospital in Philadelphia.

10:54

"The Curious Cook" Solves Some Kitchen Mysteries

Food writer Harold McGee investigates the science of everyday cooking -- things like whether blowing on soup really cools it, or why hot water turns into ice cubes quicker than cold water. His new book is called The Curious Cook.

08:54

A Fiction Writer Turns to Food

Novelist Laurie Colwin has published a collection of essays about food called Home Cooking. While many of her friends enjoy traveling, her idea of a good time is staying home and making a good meal. She also cooks for the needy at homeless shelters.

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