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Soul music

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55:34

Bob Neloms' Life As Motown's House Pianist.

Jazz pianist Bob Neloms joins the show to discuss his early career as the house pianist for Motown Records. Neloms worked with artists such as The Supremes, Martha and the Vandellas, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and Mary Wells. He can be heard on such Motown hits as "Dancing in the Streets," "You've Really Got A Hold On Me," "Baby Love," and "Heat Wave." (INTERVIEW BY DANNY MILLER)

51:13

Husband and Wife Soul Musicians Document "Love Wars."

Husband and wife Cecil Womack and Linda Womack are songwriters who have decided to step into the limelight with their album "Love Wars." The child of a gospel singer, Cecil Womack sung with his brothers, including Bobby, as The Valentinos. Linda and Cecil met in the studio. Their album was noted by many critics in 1983.

40:28

The Barrett Sisters "Say Amen"

The trio of singers, who come from a family of 10 children, join Fresh Air's Danny Miller to talk about their faith, religious and musical upbringing, and admiration for soul and jazz singers of the '50s and '60s.

01:02:04

A History of Motown with Nelson George.

Nelson George is a music writer who is the author of the best-selling "The Michael Jackson Story," and the black music editor for Billboard magazine. His latest book, "Where Did Our Love Go?," is a history of the black-owned company Motown Records. Motown employed a stable of writers, producers, singers, and studio musicians who created what became known as "the Motown sound." This soul sound appealed to both black and white audiences. George argues that that the company's move from Detroit to Los Angeles caused it to lose its sound.

58:50

Soul Music and the Dream of Freedom

Music critic Peter Guralnick explore the history of soul music by looking at both the impact of individual artists and the role record companies like Motown, Atlantic and Stax played in producing their albums.

56:33

A Black Cowboy Finds His Soul

While working as a preacher at a mortuary, Solomon Burke was recruited by Atlantic Records to make a country and western album. The record was a hit, but many listeners didn't know Burke is black. He joins Fresh Air to share stories of how he later made a name in soul music.

27:46

A Black Cowboy Finds His Soul

While working as a preacher at a mortuary, Solomon Burke was recruited by Atlantic Records to make a country and western album. The record was a hit, but many listeners didn't know Burke is black. He joins Fresh Air to share stories of how he later made a name in soul music.

10:01

Soul Singer Irma Thomas.

Singer Irma Thomas. Ms. Thomas has been making records since 1958, and had a string of New Orleans rhythm-and-blues hits in the early sixties. Her popularity, however, is due in large part to her energetic live performances. Her new album, "The Way I Feel," has just been released on Rounder Records.

27:32

Temptations Singer Otis Williams

The soul icon still sings with the 1960s vocal group. Williams remembers the producers who wrote and recorded the Temptations' hit songs, and how they were able to capture soul and emotion on tape. He has a new memoir, simply called Temptations.

09:27

Soul Singer Irma Thomas

Thomas started working professionally at seventeen. The 1970s were difficult for her career: a hurricane devastated the scene around New Orleans, where she often performed. Changing musical tastes kept her from getting gigs in her new home of Los Angeles. Now, Thomas is back with a new album, called The Way I Feel.

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