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African American motion picture producers and directors

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21:23

Denzel Washington Remembers 'Malcom X' And 'The Wizard Of Oz.'

In highlights from a 2008 interview, the Oscar-winner talks with Terry Gross about reading The Autobiography of Malcolm X, which he calls "one of the greatest books I've ever read," and his love for the songs from The Wizard of Oz. He even sings a bar or two of "Follow the Yellow Brick Road."

42:02

Ava DuVernay: A New Director, After Changing Course

In January, DuVernay became the first African-American woman to win Sundance's best directing award for her second feature-length film, Middle of Nowhere. It's about a young woman who puts her life and dreams of going to medical school on hold while her husband is in prison.

16:13

From the Archives: Morgan Freeman Makes his Directorial Debut.

Actor Morgan Freeman. He's currently starring in the new film "Nurse Betty." He's one of stage and screen's most acclaimed actors, for his ability to emerse himself in different roles. He's originated the role of the chauffeur in the Broadway production of "Driving Miss Daisy." Later he revived the role in the movie version, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award.

21:47

"Gridlock'd" Director Vondie Curtis Hall

Actor Vondie Curtis Hall was raised in Detroit. He plays a doctor on the TV series "Chicago Hope" and has had roles in the movies "Broken Arrow," "Passion Fish," and "Romeo and Juliet." His latest project is the writing and directing of the new film "Gridlock'd," a comedy about the troubles two men encounter when they make a pact to overcome their heroin addictions, starring Tim Roth and Tupak Shakur.

23:00

Morgan Freeman Makes his Directorial Debut.

Actor Morgan Freeman. He's one of stage and screen's most acclaimed actors, for his ability to immerse himself in different roles. He's originated the role of the chauffeur in the Broadway production of "Driving Miss Daisy." Later he revived the role in the movie version, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award.

16:20

Actor and Film Director Bill Duke.

Actor and film Director Bill Duke. He's directed several 0ff-Broadway plays, and lots of television, including PBS's award winning teleplays, "The Meeting," and "Raisin in the Sun." He directed the movies, "A Rage in Harlem," and "Deep Cover." His latest film is "The Cemetery Club," about three Jewish widows, who meet up with an charming widower. (REBROADCAST from 2/10/93) (Interview by Marty Moss-Coane)

16:41

The Twin Directors Behind "Menace II Society"

Allen and Albert Hughes, 21-year old twins, and directors of "Menace II Society." Their mother steered them away from drugs and gangs when they were twelve by buying them video equipment. After making several music videos and short films, they've made their first feature. It's firmly in the gangster genre, an unflinching film about young men growing up in Watts. The film's 23-year old screenwriter Tyger Williams explains: "For every 'good' kid that makes it out of the ghetto, there are five more who don't.

22:03

Film Director Bill Duke

In addition to his movies, Duke directed several off-Broadway plays, and lots of television, including PBS's award winning teleplays, "The Meeting," and "A Raisin in the Sun." His films include, "A Rage in Harlem," and "Deep Cover." His latest film is "The Cemetery Club," about three Jewish widows who meet up with an charming widower.

16:27

Two African American Directors on Hollywood's Lack of Cultural Awareness

Warrington and Reginald Hudlin produced and directed the new Eddie Murphy film "Boomerang," said, at $40 million, to be the largest big budget film made by African-Americans. Their previous film, "House Party," was made for $2.6 million and was one of the most profitable movies ever made by African-Americans. Despite their success, the brothers say that Hollywood still hasn't made enough progress with regard to black actors and directors.

16:37

First-time Film Director John Singleton.

First-time film director John Singleton. His new film is "Boyz N the Hood," which is set in South Central L.A. where Singleton grew up. A number of theatres across the country have cancelled the showing of "Boyz N the Hood," because of violent outbreaks at or near theatres where its been shown. Over 30 people have been injured and one killed. But the film itself is plea to stop the violence and killing.

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